• The Association for the Study of African American Life and History establishes a theme each year to focus the public’s attention. “The theme for 2022 focuses on the importance of Black Health and Wellness. This theme acknowledges the legacy of not only Black scholars and medical practitioners in Western medicine, but also other ways of knowing (e.g., birthworkers, doulas, midwives, naturopaths, herbalists, etc.) throughout the African Diaspora. The 2022 theme considers activities, rituals and initiatives that Black communities have done to be well.”
  • Black History Month Resource Guide for Educators and Families from the Center for Racial Justice in Education offers suggestions for celebrating Black History Month in schools, lesson plans, and family engagement resources.
  • Facing History & Ourselves provides educators with resources to honor black agency and black joy. Teaching ideas to connect Black History Month to current events, history lesson plans, and several free, on demand webinars round out this extensive list.
  • Scholastic offers several options for use with younger children. Their videos, games, and activities for lower grades highlight people that have made a big impact on our world.
  • The Smithsonian’s History Explorer Black History Month collection includes lessons, primary sources, artifacts, and multimedia resources on topics from the Civil War to the civil rights movement.
  • The Library of Congress and National Archives have several online opportunities during the month of February including panel discussions and book talks.
  • BlackPast has collected a variety of resources for Black History Month. In addition to general resources, the site has resources by state, and a book list.
  • The National Education Association offers lesson plans and activities sorted by lower, middle, and upper school grades. These include fine art, science, and athletic topics. Printables, videos, quizzes, and books are also linked.
  • The National Endowment for the Humanities provides a teacher’s guide on African American History and Culture in the United States. This resource offers guiding questions, literature, and poetry.
  • The King Institute at Stanford provides document-based lesson plans and online resources. Most interesting is their animated version of the “I Have a Dream” speech.
  • This article from Edutopia encourages teachers to go beyond the textbook. They offer social media accounts, podcasts, and academic journals that can supplement existing curriculum.
  • We Are Teachers has collected 42 Black History Month activities for February and beyond. Activities include creating a virtual museum, plays, poetry, and a music playlist.